Relative Clauses 2: Can the Relative Pronoun Be Left Out?

Relative Clauses without a Relative Pronoun? “This is the tealight you gave me last year.” Is there really a relative clause here? If so, where is the that, which, who part? That’s right, the relative pronouns that, which, who can be left out (omitted), but only under certain conditions. Compare: 1. Susan is the girl ...
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Relatives 1: Relative Pronouns

Relative Pronouns In this article we will talk about the relative pronouns that, who, which, and what and their usage. 1. The relative pronouns  that / who / which  referring to preceding nouns: 1.1 “Who” and “that” can refer to humans: e.g. #1: She`s the girl who likes playing football. e.g. #2: I like neighbours ...
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“Between” or “among”?

Do you know if you should use between or among in a given situation? The prepositions ‘between’ and ‘among’ have a similar meaning, but don’t let them fool you 🙂 Let’s see how and when to use which: Between or among? between a) somebody or something is between two or more clearly separate people or ...
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-ise or -ize?

Are you sometimes confused when you see ‘realize’ in one article and then ‘realise’ in another? Are you uncertain as to how to spell it? Which is correct –ise or -ize? Is it –ise or –ize then? Good news: both of them are correct! The ending –ize is the preferred (and basically the only) spelling ...
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The Word Order 3: Subject Question

In ‘normal’ questions the subject (Tom, you, they, my mother, etc.) is always present. But what does the subject question look like? On word order in questions, see this article. What happens when we ask about the subject, that is, ask about WHO/WHAT performs the action? The subject is the missing information here. I. Present ...
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The Word Order in English 2: Questions

The word order changes in questions but other things might also happen. I. The ‘easy’ cases where ONLY the word order changes: 1. Sentences with the verb “be” (am, are, is, was, were) as predicate: only the word order changes, the verb “be” comes first and then comes the subject e.g.#1: She is nice. – ...
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english word order

The Word Order in English 1

Reminder: there is no noun declination (nominative, accusative, dative, etc.) in English. This has consequences: word order is rather fixed (SVO = Subject Verb Object). The Word Order Makes a Difference Notice the difference: Kate killed Joe.    vs.     Joe killed Kate. It DOES make a difference what the word order is! Because this ...
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cake

The Passive Voice

A passive voice can be found in many languages. Here, we will discuss the passive voice in English. Let’s take a look at its structure and usage. What happens in “the passive”? Do you find it hard to understand the passive in English? And is it sometimes difficult to recognise or to form? You are ...
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Inversion

What is inversion and when to use it? Inversion: when two expressions switch places in the sentence and thus the ‘normal’ word order changes Inversion here means  question word order   or   verb + subject word order   after certain expressions in the sentence. So when does it happen? These are the cases: I. After negative ...
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time clauses

Time Clauses

Have you ever wondered why we say ‘I will call you as soon as I get home’? Why not use ‘will get’ there? Because it’s a time clause and time clauses have there own special rules. Time Clauses with when, as soon as, after, etc. We cannot use will in time clauses with when, as ...
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